Highlights — Some exciting recent scientific results from our group

Based on observations from the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) in China, an international research team led by Jumei Yao, including Michael Kramer from the MPIfR, found the first evidence for three-dimensional (3D) spin-velocity alignment in pulsars.The study was published in Nature Astronomy on May 6 (CAS-Press Release, May 07, 2021).

FAST Radio Telescope Detects 3D Spin-velocity Alignment in a Pulsar

May 07, 2021

Based on observations from the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) in China, an international research team led by Jumei Yao, including Michael Kramer from the MPIfR, found the first evidence for three-dimensional (3D) spin-velocity alignment in pulsars.The study was published in Nature Astronomy on May 6 (CAS-Press Release, May 07, 2021). [more]
Using the South African MeerKAT telescope, astronomers started to systematically explore binary pulsars for tests of gravity
An international group of astronomers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany and the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver presents the first results of a large program to use South Africa’s MeerKAT radio telescope to test the theories of Einstein with unprecedented precision.

A new telescope to study Einstein’s theory and Nature’s most compact objects

May 06, 2021

Using the South African MeerKAT telescope, astronomers started to systematically explore binary pulsars for tests of gravity

An international group of astronomers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany and the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver presents the first results of a large program to use South Africa’s MeerKAT radio telescope to test the theories of Einstein with unprecedented precision.
[more]
South Africa’s MeerKAT Radio Telescope explored the central regions of globular clusters in search of very weak pulsars
A group of astronomers, led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany, has discovered 8 millisecond pulsars located within dense clusters of stars, known as “globular clusters”, using South Africa’s MeerKAT radio telescope. Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars, the most compact star known, that spin up to 700 times per second. This result comes from the synergic work of two international collaborations, TRAPUM and MeerTIME.

The Discovery of 8 New Millisecond Pulsars

April 28, 2021

South Africa’s MeerKAT Radio Telescope explored the central regions of globular clusters in search of very weak pulsars

A group of astronomers, led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, Germany, has discovered 8 millisecond pulsars located within dense clusters of stars, known as “globular clusters”, using South Africa’s MeerKAT radio telescope. Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars, the most compact star known, that spin up to 700 times per second. This result comes from the synergic work of two international collaborations, TRAPUM and MeerTIME.
[more]
Two international teams of astronomers have narrowed-down the origin of the flashes produced in the fast radio burst FRB20180916B by examining them with the highest time resolution and at the lowest possible frequencies. These studies, using the Effelsberg 100-m telescope within the EVN network and the European LOFAR telescope network, have been published in Nature Astronomy and in The Astrophysical Journal Letters (JIVE Press Release, April 15, 2021).

Famous fast radio burst FRB20180916B just barely lets itself be captured

April 15, 2021

Two international teams of astronomers have narrowed-down the origin of the flashes produced in the fast radio burst FRB20180916B by examining them with the highest time resolution and at the lowest possible frequencies. These studies, using the Effelsberg 100-m telescope within the EVN network and the European LOFAR telescope network, have been published in Nature Astronomy and in The Astrophysical Journal Letters (JIVE Press Release, April 15, 2021).
[more]
 
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