Research Highlights

Research Highlights

Here we show recent research results from the Radio Astronomy/Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry department.
European Research Council supports Bonn astrophysicists with 2.5 million euros to explain the phenomenon

Black holes as magnetic jet engines

April 22, 2021

European Research Council supports Bonn astrophysicists with 2.5 million euros to explain the phenomenon [more]

Challenging the radio galaxy classification with the VLA-COSMOS survey at 10 cm wavelength

20 April 2021

An international team of astronomers led by Eleni Vardoulaki (affiliated to the MPI für Radioastronomie, at present at the Thüringer Landessternwarte in Tautenburg) has studied a sample of faint radio galaxies down to μJy levels with the 15-GHz sample of the VLA-COSMOS survey.  Radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) are traditionally separated into two Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type classes, edge-brightened FRII sources or edge-darkened FRI sources. This dichotomy is becoming too simplistic in linking the radio structure to the physical properties of radio AGN, their hosts, and their environment.  The work by Vardoulaki and collaborators approached the study of these galaxies both measured by a machine-learning algorithm and also by hand, following a parametric approach to the FR classification. Different physical parameters were estimated, as well as the galaxy host properties.  The work shows a broad distribution and overlap of Fanaroff-Riley radio galaxies and jet-less/compact radio active galactic nuclei populations.  The results point to the need for a different classification scheme, that expands the classic  classification by taking into consideration the physical properties of the objects rather than their projected radio structure which is frequency-, sensitivity- and resolution-dependent. 

These results are presented in the last issue of the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, see the original publication here.

Space (blue contours) and ground-array (heat colour scale) radio interferometric image of the quasar 3C 345 at a wavelength of 21 cm.  The image reveals the big step forward in resolution provided by the RadioAstron mission.  Figure 2 from the original publication (F. Pötzl et al., A&A 648, A82, 2021). Zoom Image
Space (blue contours) and ground-array (heat colour scale) radio interferometric image of the quasar 3C 345 at a wavelength of 21 cm.  The image reveals the big step forward in resolution provided by the RadioAstron mission.  Figure 2 from the original publication (F. Pötzl et al., A&A 648, A82, 2021). [less]

RadioAstron reveals the complex structure in the jet of quasar 3C 345

14 April 2021

A team of radio astronomers led by the MPIfR astrophysicist Felix M. Pötzl has studied the innermost jet morphology and magnetic field strength in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) 3C 345 with an unprecedented resolution using images obtained within the framework of the key science programme on AGN polarisation of the Space VLBI mission RadioAstron.  The results analyze images obtained at a wavelength of 21 cm on 2016 March 30 with RadioAstron and eighteen ground-based radio telescopes.  The obtained images reveal a complex jet structure a resolution corresponding to a projected linear scale of about 2 pc or a few thousand gravitational radii.  This work identfies the synchrotron self-absorbed core at the jet base and find a brightest feature in the jet several parsecs downstream of the core.  The work also studies the linearly polarised emission, which is related to the magnetic field distribution in the jet, and the intrinsic brightness of the source and its information about the source physics (via the so-called brightness temperature).

Additional information can be obtained at the original publication here.

Telescopes unite in unprecedented observations of the famous black hole

Multifrequency Observations of M87*

April 14, 2021

Telescopes unite in unprecedented observations of the famous black hole [more]

Zoom Out of the Black Hole M87*

Beginning with the EHT’s now iconic image of M87, a new video takes viewers on a journey through the data from each telescope. Each step provides data across many factors of ten in scale, both of wavelengths of light and physical size.

Observing campaign in April 2021: world-wide radio telescope network retakes observations after 3-year long break

Event Horizon Telescope 2021

April 14, 2021

Observing campaign in April 2021: world-wide radio telescope network retakes observations after 3-year long break [more]
Kick-off for Europe’s largest astronomy network

The Opticon-RadioNet Pilot Project (ORP) is launched

March 25, 2021

Kick-off for Europe’s largest astronomy network [more]
Event Horizon Telescope Observations of Polarised Radio Emission of the Supermassive Object in the Centre of M87

EHT Astronomers Image Magnetic Fields at the Edge of M 87’s Black Hole

March 24, 2021

Event Horizon Telescope Observations of Polarised Radio Emission of the Supermassive Object in the Centre of M87 [more]

Zoom into the Magnetized Black Hole M87* | Event Horizon Telescope

The Black Hole M87* Seen Through a Polarizer | Event Horizon Telescope

What is Polarization? | Event Horizon Telescope

How Magnetic Fields Affect Black Hole Images | Event Horizon Telescope

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Collimating jets in radio galaxies: the case of NGC 315

The jet in the galaxy NGC 315 from scales of light-weeks (bottom) to light-millions of years (top). Zoom Image
The jet in the galaxy NGC 315 from scales of light-weeks (bottom) to light-millions of years (top).

11 March 2021

A study presented by a European team led by the MPIfR astronomer Bia Boccardi (head of an Otto Hahn Research Group) today in Astronomy and Astrophysics reveals a zoom in the structure of the powerful jets in this radio galaxy.  The double jet in this galaxy shows a remarkable persistence in its direction at very different scales.  The collimation, apparently, is already completed in the innermost region (parabolic shape) and is kept for scales much larger than the optical galaxy (conical shape). 

The optical nebula hosting the powerful jet has the number 315 in the New General Catalogue (NGC 315).  It is an elliptical galaxy in the constellation Pisces.  It was discovered on September 11, 1784 by William Herschel.  It is also known as HOLM 028A, OB +392, and TXS 0055+300.

Furthermore, Boccardi's work discusses the possibility that relativistic jets are collimated by winds originated by the accretion disk which surrounds the super massive black hole.  The study suggests that a powerful external layer in the jets (sheath) stabilizes the inner spine by isolating it from the interstellar medium, so that the jet travels mostly unperturbed to reach the intergalactic medium.  These considerations also play a role to define the different types of galaxy, classified as type I (luminosity decreases as the distance from the central galaxy or quasar host increase) or type II (increasing luminosity in the lobes) in 1974.  The publication (open access) can be found here.

The 2021 Royal Astronomical Society Group Achievement Award goes to the EHT Project

Honour for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)

January 08, 2021

The 2021 Royal Astronomical Society Group Achievement Award goes to the EHT Project [more]
 
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